“Work in Canada” is definitely the most searched inquiry at FilipinosInCanada.com.

Before even looking for employment opportunities abroad, it might be a good idea to learn how it all works. It’s pretty complicated, but if you take the time to understand the basics, you’ll save yourself a lot of heartache and money down the line.

WHAT IS THE TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKER PROGRAM (TFWP)?

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program is a Government of Canada program that allows Canadian employers to temporarily hire foreign nationals to work in Canada, in the absence of qualified Canadian citizens or permanent residents.

The program started in 1973, when Canadian hospitals started bringing in foreign-trained doctors. It was expanded in 2002 to include low-skilled workers, including Live-In Caregivers.

HOW DO I APPLY FOR THE TFWP?

If you are a foreign worker, you actually don’t initiate the process, your prospective Canadian employer does.

WHO’S IN CHARGE OF THE TWFP?

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) jointly manage the TWFP.

WHAT DO I DO FIRST?

The prospective Canadian employer must meet the requirements for hiring a foreign worker under the TFWP. The employer must first determine if they need a Labour Market Impact Assessment from ESDC. If they do, they have to first apply and then be issued a positive LMIA.

WHAT IS A LABOUR MARKET IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LMIA)?

A Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) is a document that an employer in Canada must usually get before hiring a foreign worker. The LMIA verifies that there is a need for a temporary worker and that no Canadian citizens nor permanent residents are available to do the job. There are exceptions.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

After a positive LMIA has been issued to the Canadian employer, a copy of the confirmation letter will be provided to the foreign worker. The foreign worker will then apply for a work permit at the nearest Canadian embassy or consulate to their location.

IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE I SHOULD KNOW?

Well, yes. Before you start packing your bags and asking your relatives what they would like for pasalubong, remember that you still have to actually apply at the Canadian embassy or consulate for a visa.

If you are currently living (or working) outside of the Philippines, you might be able to file an application at your current location (if you are in a country that has a Canadian embassy or consulate).

If you are currently living in the Philippines, you will be submitting your application to the Embassy of Canada in Manila. You will also have to submit requirements to the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration.

In both cases, your Canadian employer must also submit requirements to the Philippine embassy or consulates in Canada.

FAQs

HOW DO I START LOOKING FOR WORK?

It’s always a good idea to use your personal network first. If you have any professional or personal contacts, explore those first. There are also online resources available such as the Government of Canada’s Job Bank. If you are in the Philippines, a list of jobs is available from the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA). In either case, use caution to avoid being a victim of fraud.

DO I NEED A RECRUITMENT AGENCY?

If you are applying for a work permit outside of the Philippines, you do not need to acquire the services of a recruitment agency. If you are applying for a work permit from the Philippines, the Canadian employer must submit requirements to the POEA. In most cases, the Canadian employer must acquire the services of a POEA-licensed agency.

DO I NEED TO PAY TO WORK IN CANADA?

No, you do not need to pay a recruitment fee to work in Canada. Any costs relating to the recruitment of a foreign worker must be shouldered by the Canadian employer. If you make special arrangements with your agency, don’t expect your money back.

Our best advice? Whenever there is money involved, always, always ask for a receipt.

WHO WILL PAY FOR MY PLANE TICKET TO Canada?

The cost of travel to and from Canada must be shouldered by the Canadian employer. The cost of travel cannot be recovered from the foreign worker by the Canadian employer nor any recruitment agencies hired by the Canadian employer.

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